New York Times Bestsellers
Week of July 12, 2020
FICTION
#1  (Last Week: 3 • Weeks on List: 96)  
Where The Crawdads Sing
Book Jacket   Delia Owens
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. A wild child's isolated, dirt-poor upbringing in a Southern coastal wilderness fails to shield her from heartbreak or an accusation of murder."The Marsh Girl," "swamp trash"Catherine "Kya" Clark is a figure of mystery and prejudice in the remote North Carolina coastal community of Barkley Cove in the 1950s and '60s. Abandoned by a mother no longer able to endure her drunken husband's beatings and then by her four siblings, Kya grows up in the careless, sometimes-savage company of her father, who eventually disappears, too. Alone, virtually or actually, from age 6, Kya learns both to be self-sufficient and to find solace and company in her fertile natural surroundings. Owens (Secrets of the Savanna, 2006, etc.), the accomplished co-author of several nonfiction books on wildlife, is at her best reflecting Kya's fascination with the birds, insects, dappled light, and shifting tides of the marshes. The girl's collections of shells and feathers, her communion with the gulls, her exploration of the wetlands are evoked in lyrical phrasing which only occasionally tips into excess. But as the child turns teenager and is befriended by local boy Tate Walker, who teaches her to read, the novel settles into a less magical, more predictable pattern. Interspersed with Kya's coming-of-age is the 1969 murder investigation arising from the discovery of a man's body in the marsh. The victim is Chase Andrews, "star quarterback and town hot shot," who was once Kya's lover. In the eyes of a pair of semicomic local police officers, Kya will eventually become the chief suspect and must stand trial. By now the novel's weaknesses have become apparent: the monochromatic characterization (good boy Tate, bad boy Chase) and implausibilities (Kya evolves into a polymatha published writer, artist, and poet), yet the closing twist is perhaps its most memorable oddity.Despite some distractions, there's an irresistible charm to Owens' first foray into nature-infused romantic fiction. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
#2  (Last Week: 1 • Weeks on List: 5)  
The Vanishing Half
Book Jacket   Brit Bennett
 
#3  (Last Week: 2 • Weeks on List: 3)  
28 Summers
 Elin Hilderbrand
  Book Jacket
#4  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
Sex And Vanity
 Kevin Kwan
  Book Jacket
 
#5  (Last Week: 4 • Weeks on List: 10)  
Camino Winds
Book Jacket   John Grisham
#6  (Last Week: 6 • Weeks on List: 5)  
The Guest List
Book Jacket   Lucy Foley
 
#7  (Last Week: 5 • Weeks on List: 4)  
The Summer House
 James Patterson and Brendan DuBois
  Book Jacket
#8  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
Home Before Dark
 Riley Sager
  Book Jacket
 
#9  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
Mexican Gothic
Book Jacket   Silvia Moreno-Garcia
#10  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
Friends And Strangers
Book Jacket   J Courtney Sullivan
 


NONFICTION
#1  (Last Week: 1 • Weeks on List: 2)  
The Room Where It Happened
 John Bolton
  Book Jacket
#2  (Last Week: 2 • Weeks on List: 18)  
How To Be An Antiracist
 Ibram X Kendi
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. Title notwithstanding, this latest from the National Book Award-winning author is no guidebook to getting woke.In fact, the word "woke" appears nowhere within its pages. Rather, it is a combination memoir and extension of Atlantic columnist Kendi's towering Stamped From the Beginning (2016) that leads readers through a taxonomy of racist thought to anti-racist action. Never wavering from the thesis introduced in his previous book, that "racism is a powerful collection of racist policies that lead to racial inequity and are substantiated by racist ideas," the author posits a seemingly simple binary: "Antiracism is a powerful collection of antiracist policies that lead to racial equity and are substantiated by antiracist ideas." The author, founding director of American University's Antiracist Research and Policy Center, chronicles how he grew from a childhood steeped in black liberation Christianity to his doctoral studies, identifying and dispelling the layers of racist thought under which he had operated. "Internalized racism," he writes, "is the real Black on Black Crime." Kendi methodically examines racism through numerous lenses: power, biology, ethnicity, body, culture, and so forth, all the way to the intersectional constructs of gender racism and queer racism (the only section of the book that feels rushed). Each chapter examines one facet of racism, the authorial camera alternately zooming in on an episode from Kendi's life that exemplifies ite.g., as a teen, he wore light-colored contact lenses, wanting "to be Black butnotto look Black"and then panning to the history that informs it (the antebellum hierarchy that valued light skin over dark). The author then reframes those received ideas with inexorable logic: "Either racist policy or Black inferiority explains why White people are wealthier, healthier, and more powerful than Black people today." If Kendi is justifiably hard on America, he's just as hard on himself. When he began college, "anti-Black racist ideas covered my freshman eyes like my orange contacts." This unsparing honesty helps readers, both white and people of color, navigate this difficult intellectual territory.Not an easy read but an essential one. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
  Book Jacket
 
#3  (Last Week: 4 • Weeks on List: 17)  
Untamed
Book Jacket   Glennon Doyle
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. More life reflections from the bestselling author on themes of societal captivity and the catharsis of personal freedom.In her third book, Doyle (Love Warrior, 2016, etc.) begins with a life-changing event. "Four years ago," she writes, "married to the father of my three children, I fell in love with a woman." That woman, Abby Wambach, would become her wife. Emblematically arranged into three sections"Caged," "Keys," "Freedom"the narrative offers, among other elements, vignettes about the soulful author's girlhood, when she was bulimic and felt like a zoo animal, a "caged girl made for wide-open skies." She followed the path that seemed right and appropriate based on her Catholic upbringing and adolescent conditioning. After a downward spiral into "drinking, drugging, and purging," Doyle found sobriety and the authentic self she'd been suppressing. Still, there was trouble: Straining an already troubled marriage was her husband's infidelity, which eventually led to life-altering choices and the discovery of a love she'd never experienced before. Throughout the book, Doyle remains open and candid, whether she's admitting to rigging a high school homecoming court election or denouncing the doting perfectionism of "cream cheese parenting," which is about "giving your children the best of everything." The author's fears and concerns are often mirrored by real-world issues: gender roles and bias, white privilege, racism, and religion-fueled homophobia and hypocrisy. Some stories merely skim the surface of larger issues, but Doyle revisits them in later sections and digs deeper, using friends and familial references to personify their impact on her life, both past and present. Shorter pieces, some only a page in length, manage to effectively translate an emotional gut punch, as when Doyle's therapist called her blooming extramarital lesbian love a "dangerous distraction." Ultimately, the narrative is an in-depth look at a courageous woman eager to share the wealth of her experiences by embracing vulnerability and reclaiming her inner strength and resiliency.Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
#4  (Last Week: 3 • Weeks on List: 92)  
Between The World And Me
Book Jacket   Ta-Nehisi Coates
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. The powerful story of a father's past and a son's future. Atlantic senior writer Coates (The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, 2008) offers this eloquent memoir as a letter to his teenage son, bearing witness to his own experiences and conveying passionate hopes for his son's life. "I am wounded," he writes. "I am marked by old codes, which shielded me in one world and then chained me in the next." Coates grew up in the tough neighborhood of West Baltimore, beaten into obedience by his father. "I was a capable boy, intelligent and well-liked," he remembers, "but powerfully afraid." His life changed dramatically at Howard University, where his father taught and from which several siblings graduated. Howard, he writes, "had always been one of the most critical gathering posts for black people." He calls it The Mecca, and its faculty and his fellow students expanded his horizons, helping him to understand "that the black world was its own thing, more than a photo-negative of the people who believe they are white." Coates refers repeatedly to whites' insistence on their exclusive racial identity; he realizes now "that nothing so essentialist as race" divides people, but rather "the actual injury done by people intent on naming us, intent on believing that what they have named matters more than anything we could ever actually do." After he married, the author's world widened again in New York, and later in Paris, where he finally felt extricated from white America's exploitative, consumerist dreams. He came to understand that "race" does not fully explain "the breach between the world and me," yet race exerts a crucial force, and young blacks like his son are vulnerable and endangered by "majoritarian bandits." Coates desperately wants his son to be able to live "apart from feareven apart from me." This moving, potent testament might have been titled "Black Lives Matter." Or: "An American Tragedy." Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
 
#5  (Last Week: - • Weeks on List: 1)  
Begin Again
 Eddie S Glaude Jr
  Book Jacket
#6  (Last Week: 8 • Weeks on List: 19)  
The Splendid And The Vile
 Erik Larson
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. The bestselling author deals with one of the most satisfying good-vs.-evil battles in history, the year (May 1940 to May 1941) during which Churchill and Britain held off Hitler.Bookshelves groan with histories of Britain's finest hour, but Larson (Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania, 2015, etc.) employs a mildly unique strategy, combining an intense, almost day-to-day account of Churchill's actions with those of his family, two of his officials (Frederick Lindemann, who was Churchill's prime science adviser, and Lord Beaverbrook, minister of air production), and staff, including private secretary Jock Colville and bodyguard Walter Thompson. Since no one doubted they lived in extraordinary times and almost everyone kept journals and wrote letters, the author takes full advantage of an avalanche of material, much of which will be unfamiliar to readers. Churchill remains the central figure; his charisma, public persona, table talk, quirks, and sybaritic lifestyle retain their fascination. Authors have not ignored his indispensable wife, Clementine (Sonia Purnell's 2015 biography is particularly illuminating), but even history buffs will welcome Larson's attention to their four children, especially Mary, a perky adolescent and his favorite. He makes no attempt to rehabilitate Winston's only son, Randolph, a heavy-drinking spendthrift whose long-suffering wife, Pamela, finally consoled herself with a long affair with American representative Averell Harriman, which was no secret to the family and was entirely approved. Britain's isolation ended when Germany invaded the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, but Larson ends on May 10. The Blitz was in full swing, with a particularly destructive raid on London, but that day also saw Rudolf Hess, Hitler's second in command, fly to England and engage in a wacky attempt (planned since the previous autumn) to negotiate peace. Nothing came of Hess' action, but that day may also have marked the peak of the Blitz, which soon diminished as Germany concentrated its forces against the Soviet Union.A captivating history of Churchill's heroic year, with more than the usual emphasis on his intimates. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
  Book Jacket
 
#7  (Last Week: 7 • Weeks on List: 82)  
Becoming
Book Jacket   Michelle Obama
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. First U.S. publication for a deceased Swedish author (1954–2004); this first of his three novels, a bestseller in Europe, is a labored mystery. It's late 2002. Mikael Blomkvist, reputable Stockholm financial journalist, has just lost a libel case brought by a notoriously devious tycoon. He's looking at a short jail term and the ruin of his magazine, which he owns with his best friend and occasional lover, Erika Berger. The case has brought him to the attention of Henrik Vanger, octogenarian, retired industrialist and head of the vast Vanger clan. Henrik has had a report on him prepared by Lisbeth Salander, the eponymous Girl, a freaky private investigator. The 24-year-old Lisbeth is a brilliant sleuth, and no wonder: She's the best computer hacker in Sweden. Henrik hires Mikael to solve an old mystery, the disappearance of his great-niece Harriet, in 1966. Henrik is sure she was murdered; every year the putative killer tauntingly sends him a pressed flower on his birthday (Harriet's custom). He is equally sure one of the Vangers is the murderer. They're a nasty bunch, Nazis and ne'er-do-wells. There are three story lines here: The future of the magazine, Lisbeth's travails (she has a sexually abusive guardian) and, most important, the Harriet mystery. This means an inordinately long setup. Only at the halfway point is there a small tug of excitement as Mikael breaks the case and enlists Lisbeth's help. The horrors are legion: Rape, incest, torture and serial killings continuing into the present. Mikael is confronted by an excruciating journalistic dilemma, resolved far too swiftly as we return to the magazine and the effort to get the evil tycoon, a major miscalculation on Larsson's part. The tycoon's empire has nothing to do with the theme of violence against women which has linked Lisbeth's story to the Vanger case, and the last 50 pages are inevitably anticlimactic. Juicy melodrama obscured by the intricacies of problem-solving. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
#8  (Last Week: 5 • Weeks on List: 7)  
Me And White Supremacy
Book Jacket   Layla F Saad
Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. An activist program for confronting white privilege and dismantling white supremacy.Building on a workbook downloaded by nearly 90,000 readers, multicultural writer Saad, born in Britain and now living in Doha, Qatar, delivers "a one of a kind personal antiracism tool" that is meant foremost to teach white readers how to recognize their privilege and "take ownership of their participation in the oppressive system of white supremacy." Many readers will likely recoil, protesting that they're not racist, are colorblind, have nothing but benevolent thoughts, and so forth. The author is ready for them: White supremacy, she writes, is not just a comprehensive system, but it also trains those who benefit most from it to "keep you asleep and unaware" of the power that whites hold relative to those of other races and ethnicities: "BIPOC," as in, "Black, Indigenous, and People of Color." Saad enumerates some of the features of that power: Pulled over for a traffic violation, a white motorist doesn't usually have to fear for their life; any stylist can cut their hair; popular culture considers people who look like them to be representative; and so on. The author's approach is at first confrontational and righteously indignant, but as she guides her readersincluding BIPOCs who may for whatever reason benefit from systems of white privilege and supremacythrough a monthlong series of lessons, including self-critical journal prompts, one has the sense that her method is much like that of Marine Corps boot camp: Tear down in order to build up. A reader's guilt may rise and crest, buttressed by sweeping damned-if-you-do-or-don't condemnation for such things as "clinging to pink pussy hats, safety pins, and hashtags over doing the real work." At the end, however, that reader is assured that even though they may be part of the problem, "you are simultaneously also a part of the answer."A bracing, highly useful tool for any discussion of combating racism. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
...More
 
#9  (Last Week: 9 • Weeks on List: 4)  
I'm Still Here
 Austin Channing Brown
  Book Jacket
#10  (Last Week: 6 • Weeks on List: 4)  
Countdown 1945
 Chris Wallace with Mitch Weiss
  Book Jacket
 

Back

Dickson County Public Library  |  303 Henslee Drive  |  Dickson, TN 37055  |  Phone (615) 446-8293