Reviews for Bee fearless:dream like a kid (J/Book)

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Child entrepreneur Ulmer shares the story of how she became a business owner, philanthropist, and environmental activist. Ulmer and her family loved spending time outside, but when she was stung by a bee twice in the span of a week, she became afraid to go outside. She was only 4, and her parents encouraged her to learn about bees instead of letting her fear prevent her from doing things she loved. What Ulmer learned about bees fascinated herand concerned her. Endangered bees meant an endangered food supply. Ulmer wanted to do something about that. She had seen kids selling lemonade for Austin Lemonade Day, and she decided to start saving the bees by raising money through a lemonade stand. Her passion for her business and for the bees, her parents support, her attention to every opportunity, and careful use of every bit of knowledge that came her way all carried her from weekly lemonade stands to bottling her lemonade for sale at one local pizza parlor, then an offer from Whole Foods, regional expansion, Shark Tank, and beyond. In sharing her story, this talented Black girl breaks down not only each opportunity and decision she and those who supported her had to make along the way, but also the lessons about business that she learned in the process, making this a manual as well as a memoir. Her growth is inspiring, her story is fascinating, and her wisdom is priceless for young entrepreneurs. Gift this to every aspiring and beginning entrepreneur; they will thank you. (Nonfiction. 7-16) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Child entrepreneur Ulmer shares the story of how she became a business owner, philanthropist, and environmental activist. Ulmer and her family loved spending time outside, but when she was stung by a bee twice in the span of a week, she became afraid to go outside. She was only 4, and her parents encouraged her to learn about bees instead of letting her fear prevent her from doing things she loved. What Ulmer learned about bees fascinated her—and concerned her. Endangered bees meant an endangered food supply. Ulmer wanted to do something about that. She had seen kids selling lemonade for Austin Lemonade Day, and she decided to start saving the bees by raising money through a lemonade stand. Her passion for her business and for the bees, her parents’ support, her attention to every opportunity, and careful use of every bit of knowledge that came her way all carried her from weekly lemonade stands to bottling her lemonade for sale at one local pizza parlor, then an offer from Whole Foods, regional expansion, Shark Tank, and beyond. In sharing her story, this talented Black girl breaks down not only each opportunity and decision she and those who supported her had to make along the way, but also the lessons about business that she learned in the process, making this a manual as well as a memoir. Her growth is inspiring, her story is fascinating, and her wisdom is priceless for young entrepreneurs. Gift this to every aspiring and beginning entrepreneur; they will thank you. (Nonfiction. 7-16) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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