Reviews for The Oysterville Sewing Circle (Book)

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

After facing tragedy and betrayal in New York, an aspiring fashion designer escapes to her idyllic Pacific coast hometown to raise her best friend's two young children and finds inspiration, redemption, and love in the unexpected journey.Caroline Shelby always dreamed of leaving tiny Oysterville, Washington, and becoming a couturier. After years of toil, she finally has a big break only to discover a famous designer has stolen her launch line. When she accuses him, he blackballs her, so she's already struggling when her best friend, Angelique, a renowned model from Haiti whose work visa has expired, shows up on her doorstep with her two biracial children, running from an abusive partner she won't identify. When Angelique dies of a drug overdose, Caroline takes custody of the kids and flees back to her hometown. She reconnects with her sprawling family and with Will and Sierra Jensen, who were once her best friends, though their relationships have grown more complicated since Will and Sierra married. Caroline feels guilty that she didn't realize Angelique was abused and tries to make a difference when she discovers that people she knows in Oysterville are also victims of domestic violence. She creates a support group that becomes a welcome source of professional assistance when some designs she works on for the kids garner local interest that grows regional, then national. Meanwhile, restless Sierra pursues her own dreams, leading to Will and Caroline's exploring some unresolved feelings. Wiggs' latest is part revenge fantasy and part romantic fairy tale, and while some details feel too smoothhow fortunate that every person in the circle has some helpful occupation that benefits Caroline's businessCaroline has a challenging road, and she rises to it with compassion and resilience. Timelines alternating among the present and past, both recent and long ago, add tension and depth to a complex narrative that touches on the abuse of power toward women and the extra-high stakes when the women involved are undocumented. Finally, Wiggs writes about the children's race and immigration status with a soft touch that feels natural and easygoing but that might seem unrealistic to some readers. A lovely readentertaining, poignant, and meaningful. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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